Keep The Fisherman In Your Life Happy: Understanding The Tackle In Their Box

While you may not care about what is in a tackle box, the fisherman in your life does. Whether you are newly dating a guy that loves fishing, or you have been moving around your husband’s fishing supplies for years, understanding what is inside will be appreciated by the person you love. It might not make sense to you to have custom swimbaits, sinkers, lures, and a million hooks in the box, but it matters to your loved one. Consider this, if you are a woman who loves perfume, you can’t get by with just one type. You need variety in your life, and so does the fisherman that you love. Basic Tackle Box Supplies Sinkers, hooks, and fishing line are some of the basic supplies that you will find in a tackle box. Sinkers are usually gray colored, and are little balls that attach to the fishing line. Sinkers are used to add weight to the fishing line, making it possible to cast the line out farther. Sinkers come in a variety of sizes, and they get lost easily when the fishing line gets caught. You may see a large number of sinkers in the tackle box, but they are inexpensive and need to be replaced all the time. Hooks also come in a number of sizes, depending on the type of fish you are trying to catch. Hooks get caught on grass, weeds, logs, and any other debris in the water. Plenty of hooks are needed during a day of fishing. Those Tiny Fish With Hooks on Them When you see all of these fake little fish in your loved one’s tackle box, covered in hooks, these are lures or swimbaits. Each different lure or swimbait is used for a different type of fish. It’s possible that your loved one has old lures, passed down from their father or grandfather. When you want to impress the fisherman in your life with a thoughtful gift, a custom swimbait...

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Tips For Transitioning From Playing College Baseball To Rec-League Softball

When you’ve played baseball at the college level, you’re likely one of the best athletes in your social circle. This means that when it comes time for your friends or colleagues to form a recreational softball league, they might eagerly anticipate the idea of adding you to their roster. As a seasoned player, you’ll be able to help the team win some games — but it’s important to dial down your intensity a little. Rec-league softball isn’t as competitive as college baseball, so you don’t want to carry the same level of intensity that you had in college. Here are some changes that you’ll want to make to your game. Don’t Slide In Hard In recreational softball, some baserunners slide — and others do not. If you plan to slide on close plays, make sure that you do so cleanly. In college, a runner heading to second base will slide in hard with the intention of disrupting the second baseman or shortstop covering the base. The hope is that your slide can cause him to drop the ball or be knocked off balance and unable to throw the ball to first base to complete the double play. This isn’t part of the game in recreational softball, though, so make sure you slide only to the base, rather than at the fielder. Don’t Rip Line Drives Up The Middle While you can’t always dictate where your hits will go, you should try to avoid hitting line drives up the middle of the diamond. In college, doing so can be advantageous — a hard line drive that deflects off a pitcher’s glove can carom away from him, allowing you to scamper to first base. In recreational softball, the pitcher’s rubber is significantly closer than in college baseball, meaning that your hard line drive up the middle could injure the pitcher. Don’t Make Snap Throws In baseball parlance, a snap throw is a quick one that is designed to catch a runner...

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